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Flowers Produce Nectar and Attract Our Bees

Honey bees collect pollen and nectar from the blooming flowers. Bees uses their tongues named as proboscis to suck the nectar out of the flowers and they store it in their extra stomach, or crop. Nectar is 80% water and honey is about 14-18% water.

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Bees Collect the Nectar and Carry It to the Beehive

After that bees carry the nectar to the beehive. While sloshing inside the bee’s crop for about half an hour the nectar mixes with the proteins and enzymes produced by the bees, converting the nectar into honey and make it more suitable for long-term storage. The bees then deposit the honey into the beeswax comb, which are hexagonal cells made of wax produced by the bees, and repeat the process until the combs are full. To use honey for long term bee turn their wings into the fan and evaporate the water and thicken the honey.

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Bees Seal Cells with Wax and Honey Ripens

When most of the water has evaporated from the honeycomb, the bee seals the comb with the secretion of liquid from its abdomen, which eventually hardens into beeswax. Aside from air and water, honey can be collected continuously, providing bees with the perfect food source for cold winter months.

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We Collect the Product and Transfer It to the Packaging

To remove the honeycombs the beekeeper wears a helmet and protective gloves. The beekeeper moves away bees from the comb and guides them to move into the new hive. While taking out the comb beekeeper check that majority of the cells are capped and check the comb by shaking it. If honey rushes out then the comb is kept back for few more day. The one-third portion of honey is left in the hive to feed the bees. Than honeycombs are moved into the place where there are no bees. Then honey is extracted from the comb. The honey is then filled into jars or cans for shipment to retail and industrial customers.